Some European and African countries, such as San Marino (46 days) and Togo (43 days), offer some of the most generous holiday schemes for their workers. This is in sharp contrast to the United States, where there is no federal or state minimum allowance for paid holidays or public holidays. But when looking at which country gets the most paid vacation days overall, Iran comes up top, offering a grand total of 53 days, split pretty evenly between paid annual leave and paid public holidays.

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Which towns lend themselves best to literary representation? The map below shows the city from every state that you are most likely to stumble upon in a novel. You might have guessed that New York City is the most common United States setting for fiction. The crossword-Solver team found 2,609 books set in New York — if you read one a month, it’ll take you 217½ years to get through all of them.

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Most Overrated Tourist Spot By U.S. State

Amusement/theme parks and scenic railroads are the seven states’ most overrated tourist attractions. But another six states count casinos as their most disappointing spot. Despite the trend, Nevada’s most overrated is not a casino. CSI: The Experience is Las Vegas’s “interactive, hands-on, crime-solving” day out, but TripAdvisor reviewers were disappointed by the lack of realism and the ease of cracking the case.

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Early in 1902, the Chinese government began to enumerate the Empire’s population for taxation purposes. The population of the eighteen provinces of China proper was 407,734,330.

Even back then, China was the most populous country. The British Empire had almost a similar population. The third most populous country was the Russian Empire. Despite its high population and potential ability to assemble a large army, China was the object of the claims of the great powers of the time.

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The Cretaceous is the 3rd and final period of the Mesozoic Era geological period that continued from about 145 to 66 million years ago.

It was a geologic period with a comparatively warm climate, resulting in high eustatic sea levels that shaped many shallow inland water bodies.

Below is the map of North America 77 million years ago. According to this map, In the Late Cretaceous, the many contemporary U.S. states were beneath the waves of the Western Interior Seaway. It’s fascinating that elevations and water levels have changed that much throughout millions of years.

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